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WhyemBigBangTheoryemActressMayimBialikCouldntHaveBraces

Mayim Bialik has spent a good part of her life in front of TV cameras: first as the child star of the hit comedy series Blossom, and more recently as Sheldon Cooper’s love interest — a nerdy neuroscientist — on The Big Bang Theory. (In between, she actually earned a PhD in neuroscience from UCLA…but that’s another story.) As a child, Bialik had a serious overbite — but with all her time on camera, braces were just not an option.

“I never had braces,” she recently told Dear Doctor – Dentistry & Oral Health magazine. “I was on TV at the time, and there weren’t a lot of creative solutions for kids who were on TV.” Instead, her orthodontist managed to straighten her teeth using retainers and headgear worn only at night.

Today, there are several virtually invisible options available to fix orthodontic issues — and you don’t have to be a child star to take advantage of them. In fact, both children and adults can benefit from these unobtrusive appliances.

Tooth colored braces are just like traditional metal braces, with one big difference: The brackets attached to teeth are made from a ceramic material that blends in with the natural color of teeth. All that’s visible is the thin archwire that runs horizontally across the teeth — and from a distance it’s hard to notice. Celebs like Tom Cruise and Faith Hill opted for this type of appliance.

Clear aligners are custom-made plastic trays that fit over the teeth. Each one, worn for about two weeks, moves the teeth just a bit; after several months, you’ll see a big change for the better in your smile. Best of all, clear aligners are virtually impossible to notice while you’re wearing them — which you’ll need to do for 22 hours each day. But you can remove them to eat, or for special occasions. Zac Efron and Katherine Heigl, among others, chose to wear clear aligners.

Lingual braces really are invisible. That’s because they go behind your teeth (on the tongue side), where they can’t be seen; otherwise they are similar to traditional metal braces. Lingual braces are placed on teeth differently, and wearing them often takes some getting used to at first. But those trade-offs are worth it for plenty of people. Which celebs wore lingual braces? Rumor has it that the list includes some top models, a well-known pop singer, and at least one British royal.

So what’s the best way to straighten your teeth and keep the orthodontic appliances unnoticeable? Just ask us! We’d be happy to help you choose the option that’s just right for you. You’ll get an individualized evaluation, a solution that fits your lifestyle — and a great-looking smile!

For more information about hard-to-see (or truly invisible) orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Orthodontics for the Older Adult” and “Clear Aligners for Teenagers.”

By Camden Dental Care
September 07, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   toothpaste  
KnowYourToothpasteHowtoSimplifyYourPurchasingDecision

Confused about which toothpaste to buy? You’re not alone — we’re all regularly confronted with multiple choices when we shop.

But you can simplify your decision-making process by first remembering that toothpaste has one main objective: helping to break down and remove dental plaque when you brush. Plaque is a thin film of bacteria and food particles that if you don’t remove through brushing and flossing could trigger tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Toothpastes contain abrasives and detergents to help make this possible. Abrasives like hydrated silica are gritty substances that work with the mechanical brushing action to loosen plaque. Detergents (usually sodium lauryl sulfate) help loosen and break down particles on your teeth that won’t otherwise dissolve with water alone. The combination of these ingredients and daily brushing action enables you to remove a substantial portion of plaque from your teeth every day.

These ingredients (along with others to retain moisture and bind everything together) are the foundation of any toothpaste. There are other additives, however, that you may also want to consider. The most important is fluoride, a naturally-occurring chemical proven to strengthen enamel against tooth decay. If you’re interested in a brighter smile, you can also look for bleaching agents that may help whiten some enamel staining. And, of course, there are various flavors to suit your taste.

You’ll also want to pay attention to ingredients if you have special concerns. If you have sensitive teeth, your dentist may recommend particular brands that help reduce discomfort. You’ll also want to be on the lookout for ingredients that you may be allergic to like the aforementioned sodium lauryl sulfate or flavors like cinnamon. Be sure to read the ingredients label if you have known issues with certain substances.

And while you’re reading the packaging look for one more thing — the American Dental Association Seal of Approval. This seal means any manufacturer claims for lower occurrences of cavities or other effects by that toothpaste have been independently verified.

It can be overwhelming amid all the product messaging to decide which toothpaste is right for you. But by knowing these basic facts about toothpaste, you can feel more confident choosing the right one to help keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene products, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Toothpaste: What’s in it?

By Camden Dental Care
August 23, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   celebrity smiles  
DentalCrownsfortheKingofMagic

You might think David Copperfield leads a charmed life:  He can escape from ropes, chains, and prison cells, make a Learjet or a railroad car disappear, and even appear to fly above the stage. But the illustrious illusionist will be the first to admit that making all that magic takes a lot of hard work. And he recently told Dear Doctor magazine that his brilliant smile has benefitted from plenty of behind-the-scenes dental work as well.

“When I was a kid, I had every kind of [treatment]. I had braces, I had headgear, I had rubber bands, and a retainer afterward,” Copperfield said. And then, just when his orthodontic treatment was finally complete, disaster struck. “I was at a mall, running down this concrete alleyway, and there was a little ledge… and I went BOOM!”

Copperfield’s two front teeth were badly injured by the impact. “My front teeth became nice little points,” he said. Yet, although they had lost a great deal of their structure, his dentist was able to restore those damaged teeth in a very natural-looking way. What kind of “magic” did the dentist use?

In Copperfield’s case, the teeth were repaired using crown restorations. Crowns (also called caps) are suitable when a tooth has lost part of its visible structure, but still has healthy roots beneath the gum line. To perform a crown restoration, the first step is to make a precise model of your teeth, often called an impression. This allows a replacement for the visible part of the tooth to be fabricated, and ensures it will fit precisely into your smile. In its exact shape and shade, a well-made crown matches your natural teeth so well that it’s virtually impossible to tell them apart. Subsequently, the crown restoration is permanently attached to the damaged tooth.

There’s a blend of technology and art in making high quality crowns — just as there is in some stage-crafted illusions. But the difference is that the replacement tooth is not just an illusion: It looks, functions and “feels” like your natural teeth… and with proper care it can last for many years to come.  Besides crowns, there are several other types of tooth restorations that are suitable in different situations. We can recommend the right kind of “magic” for you.

If you would like more information about crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Crowns & Bridgework” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Camden Dental Care
August 08, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  
BeSuretoHaveaDentalExamBeforeWhiteningYourTeeth

You’ve been embarrassed for a while now by your yellowed, dull teeth. You’re ready for a change.

There’s a simple and cost-effective way to make that change: you can temporarily brighten your smile with teeth whitening, possibly at home. But before you try it, you should first have a dental examination to find out if whitening is the right choice for you.

First off, healthy teeth with outer enamel staining are the best candidates for whitening. Teeth and gums with tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease should be treated first before undergoing whitening. A dental exam will uncover any health issues you may have with your mouth.

In the same vein, you’ll want to consider whitening carefully if you have dental work like veneers, crowns or implants. Unlike natural teeth, these non-biological materials won’t be affected by the bleaching agent. We can discuss any potential for color mismatch between your whitened natural teeth and your dental work during your examination.

A dental exam can also uncover one other crucial fact — what kind of tooth staining you have. There are two basic types: extrinsic, staining on the outside enamel as we’ve mentioned earlier; and intrinsic, staining that originates from inside a tooth. The whitening kits you purchase from a store and even some of the whitening techniques we use in the office only diminish extrinsic, not intrinsic staining. To address an intrinsically-stained tooth requires a much more involved, invasive clinical technique only performed by dental professionals.

Finally, a dental examination is a good discussion forum for helping you decide between a home kit and a clinical procedure. While DIY kits are effective for the most part, you won’t be able to precisely control the degree of brightness like we can. This could be important if you want a specific shade of whiteness, from a more subtle and natural shade to dazzling “Hollywood” bright. Shade control could also help minimize color mismatch with dental work.

In the end, we want to help you make the best choice for teeth whitening. Even if you decide to pursue whitening at home, we can offer you valuable advice on what to look for when you buy a kit and how to use it. That alone could help ensure you get the new, bright smile you desire!

If you would like more information on teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Important Teeth Whitening Questions…Answered!

By Camden Dental Care
July 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.





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